Another World

Gulaga's Mysteries

The forested ancient volcano that is Gulaga, also known as Mt Dromedary, can be seen from Tathra to Moruya, and hides near its summit magnificent granite tors that are of great spiritual and cultural significance to the Yuin Aboriginal people of the south coast. There have been a number of volcanic eruptions from Gulaga, the first about 95 million years ago during the Cretaceous period when dinosaurs were still at the top of the food chain.

 The volcano has had a significant impact on the surrounding environment with both Little Dromedary (Najanuka) to the east and Montague Island (Baranguba) formed through the volcano's activity. Gulaga, which is now about 800 metres above sea level, would have originally been close to two thousand metres higher, and its foothills would have extended to Tuross. The mountain that you see today is basically the inner core of the original volcano. The volcano has been dormant since the Cretaceous - which ended 65 million years ago.

How to get there: The NSW National Parks and Wildlife Service and the Gulaga Board of Management consisting of a majority of Yuin Aboriginal owners are responsible for the management of Gulaga National Park and encourage all visitors to enjoy the walk to the summit. This is approximately an 11km, 5 hour return trip that is steep in parts. The walk begins on the path behind Pam's General Store at Tilba Tilba. There are two turn offs to Tilba Tilba from the Princes Highway, approximately 18 and 16kms south of Narooma. The first will take you through heritage-listed Central Tilba and then on to Tilba Tilba which is three kilometres from the highway. The second turn off will take you straight to Tilba Tilba 1km from the highway.

What to do:  Walking, photography. Take a light picnic in your pack as you walk the path up to the top of the mountain. Enjoy the changes in the surrounding vegetation and birdlife as you go from the lowlands up the mountain, through pockets of misty rainforest near the summit.

Below: The giant tors of Gulaga have ancient and spiritual significance

View from Gulaga